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Farmwithjunk
01-07-2008, 02:47 PM
(What I did on my vacation, day #1)

A few years ago, I sold my subsoiler. Didn't think I'd ever need one again. Well, that was a mistake:badidea:

So, I bought one on EBAY. Sale closed last night just before 9PM. Seller is only a 15 minute drive from my house. We made arraingments to meet at 9AM this morning. I picked up the subsoiler, stood around and flapped my jaw for a while, and was home by 10AM. By 11, I had it dismantled, sandblasted, and primer shot. (Rustoleum enamel primer) I hung the parts over a kerosene heater. By 1PM the primer was "dry". I shot the red next. By 2:30 that was dry enough to assemble everything. (again, baked the paint w/ kerosene heater.... does good enough for implements. Wouldn't recommend this for painting a show car) By 3PM, she's ready to RIP DIRT!

If it doesn't rain, tomorrow I paint a disc.

shinnlinger
01-07-2008, 03:46 PM
looks like you painted your engine stand too...I didn't know Massey made engine stands...

How does it look now that you have used it once?

Farmwithjunk
01-07-2008, 03:57 PM
looks like you painted your engine stand too...I didn't know Massey made engine stands...

How does it look now that you have used it once?

Haven't used it yet. Too wet. Looking at mid spring a'fore it gets dry enough. Subsoiling and/or deep ripping works best when the soil is dry enough to shatter instead of simply cutting a slice through the mud.

shinnlinger
01-07-2008, 04:04 PM
HOw is it going to dry out without the "slice"?

Hey Junk, What do you think of this technique?

http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/...fpart=1&v c=1

Farmwithjunk
01-07-2008, 05:09 PM
HOw is it going to dry out without the "slice"?

Hey Junk, What do you think of this technique?

http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/...fpart=1&v c=1

You want to shatter the hardpan UNDER the surface (hence the name SUBSOILER) There will be a thin cut all the way to the surface, but if you rip "mud", the only effect is right where the shank of the subsoiler travels. Also, with muddy soil, the "cut" tends to close shut almost immediately. By shattering the hardpan, you get better drainage even in between the cuts made by the subsoiler. The only way you get that desired "shattering effect" is with relatively dry conditions.

A secondary benefit is by opening up the soil structure, crops can root deeper. I've seen test data where corn has rooted as far as 8' deep when soil structure will allow. Along about mid August, when it's drier than talcum powder on a cracker, that can be the means of a corn crop making a decent yield......or not.

In my case, I'm planning on working over the soil structure of approx. 25 acres that were once pasture. Animals can compact soil far more than the heaviest of tractors. I'm putting this acreage into a hay crop. Before I spend major bucks on fuel, fertilizer and seed, I'm breaking up the compaction.

I get a "no one home" from your link. (Page cannot be found)

Oh, and by the way, the subsoiler isn't painted with Massey Ferguson red. That's New Holland red. (as in New Holland hay baler red)

Farmwithjunk
01-07-2008, 06:12 PM
Put 'er on the 150!

PaulChristenson
01-07-2008, 06:37 PM
FMJ...what's that GREEN thing I see in the backround...:mrgreen:

shinnlinger
01-07-2008, 07:52 PM
Looks like mr junkfarmer has a gooseneck trailer he shleps around with his tractor...

JUnk,

How much power do you need to subsoil?

Farmwithjunk
01-07-2008, 08:35 PM
FMJ...what's that GREEN thing I see in the backround...:mrgreen:

No pictures of it, other than the glimpse you get in the background, but that's a trailer hitch for pulling a gooseneck with a 3-point hitch/receiver hitch for moving a bumper hitch trailer combo. That's "Oliver Green" if anyone ask's. :thumb:

Farmwithjunk
01-07-2008, 08:43 PM
JUnk,

How much power do you need to subsoil?

All depends.... Some subsoilers pull harder than others. The point has something to do with that. I'd say this one will pull like an anchor.

Soil and soil conditions play into the equasion. Operating depth will too. The ground I'm going to use this one on is deep topsoil over hard clay about 12" down. I'm going to try to get it to work as much as 18" deep.

A single shank subsoiler should work a 35 or 40 hp tractor fairly hard at that depth. I'll probably use my 2440 Deere (60hp) so I can move along at a good ground speed.

shinnlinger
01-08-2008, 07:14 PM
JUnk,

try this.
http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/...fpart=1&v c=1 (http://board.moparts.org/ubbthreads/showflat.php?Cat=0&Number=2331682&page=0&fpart=1&vc=1)

Farmwithjunk
01-08-2008, 07:29 PM
Some of my earliest attempts at painting LOOK like they were painted with a roller....:yum:

Next MAJOR paint project will be when I finally get around to restoring dads ol' Ferguson F-40. I'm working myself towards a single stage urethane. Probably a NAPA paint product.

Mark777
01-09-2008, 08:11 AM
Single stage Urethane?? Tell me more please :D.

Farmwithjunk
01-09-2008, 11:34 AM
Single stage Urethane?? Tell me more please :D.

In one line, here's what I know about it.

1.)


Now, when I get some info, I'll pass it on. NAPA sells theirs under the trade name of "starfire" I think. It was recommended by a gentleman that paints airplanes. Says it's as tough as a $2 steak, easy to apply, safer than paints with activators or hardeners. Also has a short shelf life from what I know.

Farmwithjunk
01-09-2008, 01:57 PM
In one line, here's what I know about it.

1.)


Now, when I get some info, I'll pass it on. NAPA sells theirs under the trade name of "starfire" I think. It was recommended by a gentleman that paints airplanes. Says it's as tough as a $2 steak, easy to apply, safer than paints with activators or hardeners. Also has a short shelf life from what I know.


Oooooops!

That'd be "Crossfire" 'n not starfire

Mark777
01-09-2008, 03:29 PM
Sounds interesting...really.

A single stage Urethane that proves to have good adhesion to the topcoat of any paint, and with good UV content would sure prove to be popular IMO. Hope to hear your input when you do your next project.

Thanks, Mark