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Old 05-05-2019, 10:51 AM
geohorn geohorn is offline
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Default Kerosene Added to Diesel Fuel - NO!

I've read many posts where owners tell they've added kerosene to their diesel fuel in order to combat cold weather. This USED to be an alternative when Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel was available.

No longer.

Kubota specifically states that Kerosene is NOT TO BE ADDED to diesel fuel. If cold wx is causing fuel problems, Kubota states to use an anti-gel additive or to switch to No. 1 diesel fuel.

ALSO some reminders according to Kubota:
1-NO ether or starting fluid. EVER.
2-Ethylene Glycol anti-freeze is OK... NEVER Propylene.
3-Synthetic Oil use is OK... but DO NOT extend oil change periods.
4-Bio-diesel is ok but B5(5% max) for electronic injection and up to B20 for mechanical injection.
5-ULSD (Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel) is OK for all engines.

http://www.kubotaengine.com/support/faq-2
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Old 05-05-2019, 01:53 PM
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Sounds like that advice will keep new Kubota equipment in top condition.

I violate half those rules with my elderly (early 80's) Yanmars:

* Agree, no extended oil drain intervals. It is essential to flush out the dust that farm equipment inhales, even if the oil hasn't broken down chemically. I saw a primitive early crawler with a brass plate "drain and replace oil DAILY". Likely at least 5 gallons. And worth it, to preserve what had to be a very expensive piece of equipment at the time.

* Biodiesel? It is more different from diesel than people realize. It has to be used while fresh because it turns to acid - same as spoiled food. Applications that allow biodiesel say to remove and clean the injectors far more frequently than is customary for diesel. It runs the same as diesel, a few percent of power lost but probably unnoticeable, but can be more difficult to get started in cool or cold weather.

I bought 20 gallons of biodiesel to experiment with. Trying percentages up to 100% ran acceptably in the Yanmar, but it crudded up the injectors to the degree they needed to be replaced for the first time in 30 years. I've read it is a powerful solvent and will dislodge deposits in the fuel tank and plumbing, resulting in blockages. The stuff is simply different and needs very different maintenance cycles compared to diesel.

* Kerosene? Don't try this in your expensive Kubota! I drive by the county's Hazardous Waste Disposal facility and occasionally stop in to see if someone has brought in kerosene - including Tiki Torch Fuel etc - that gets put on the re-use free table. I add 2-cycle oil at 50:1 and run a gallon of this blend added to 4 gallons of diesel, also adding Power Service etc fuel additive. With the few hours I run these old tractors in a year I doubt any increased injector wear will be significant in my lifetime.

* No starting fluid - Agree!

* Modern ULSD - my antiques weren't designed for it but no problem. I think they could burn near anything. The operator manual says something like "if there is more than a tablespoon (in cc's) of debris or water per 5 gallons of fuel added then more frequent filter changes [$6] will be needed".

I thought you guys might like to see the contrast of 'Old School' (photo) compared to modern specs.
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Old 05-05-2019, 06:20 PM
geohorn geohorn is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by California View Post
…... I saw a primitive early crawler with a brass plate "drain and replace oil DAILY". Likely at least 5 gallons. And worth it, to preserve what had to be a very expensive piece of equipment at the time......
Depending upon how "early" the crawler is.... I can recall buying quarts of oil back in the early '60s even for 8-cents per quart at a predecessor to SamsClub type stores. (It was in Houston on Griggs Rd, a place called "FedMart" which initially required membership (free) but must be an employee of a public employer (gov't/school/etc). After their 1st year anybody could shop there. They lasted about ten years. Their BEST can...yes, it was sold in actual qt cans... of detergent motor oil sold for 8-cents, and their cheapest non-det sold for 6-cents... all were straight-weight oils. 5-gal pails sold for $1.50 with a 30-cent deposit on the metal 5-gal pail, which had to be returned to the store.
A crawler could afford to change it daily at that price, heh?

Next door was "Youngbloods Fried Chicken" where on Friday night a family of 4 could eat a whole fried chicken, all you want mashed potatoes and gravy, lima beans, salad (but the only dressing was 1,000 island) and biscuits w/honey for $7.99. Those were the days!)
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Old 05-14-2019, 06:38 PM
Colorado_High Colorado_High is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by geohorn View Post
I've read many posts where owners tell they've added kerosene to their diesel fuel in order to combat cold weather. This USED to be an alternative when Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel was available.

No longer.

Kubota specifically states that Kerosene is NOT TO BE ADDED to diesel fuel. If cold wx is causing fuel problems, Kubota states to use an anti-gel additive or to switch to No. 1 diesel fuel.

snip...
It is true but misleading to say that kerosene should not be used to "cut" diesel fuel (No.2) in the winter. Winter grade diesel fuel (No. 1 diesel) is based on a kerosene fuel fraction, but kerosene and No. 1 diesel have to meet different fuel specs. Additive packages may be used to meet the specifications. Most importantly diesel fuels should meet the lubricity specification for a wear scar of no greater than 520 micrometers in the HFRR (high frequency reciprocating rig) test. This can be achieved with additives such as Opti-Lube XPD (highest rated by independent testing lab).

Kerosenes can have higher sulfur content than the 15 ppm spec for diesel fuels, but this spec is to protect particulate matter (PM) traps, which the RTVs do not have. K-1 kerosene (most commonly available) has a max sulfur content of 400 ppm which will not hurt anything in the engine, but would harm a PM trap.

So, one should not dump any old kerosene into your RTV tank, but kerosene with an additive package at the right level should work just fine. At a filling station in the winter, you never know what blend of DF-1 and DF-2 you might be getting, but if you blend your own, you know exactly what you are getting.
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