Frame gap question

cowrider

Member
On a 1100cw, what size gap do you have between the rubber stopper and the frame, unloaded? Mine has about an inch, I would think that there should be more of a gap. I would like to know what you have before I start taking things apart.
 

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shinnery

Active member
??????Are you asking about how much suspension travel do I have before the snubber bottoms out??? Or what are you trying to say??? I have a RTV-900 so it doesn't apply to me but cannot figure out the question!
 

cowrider

Member
Sorry if the question wasn't clear. Yes I am asking how much rear suspension travel others normally have on their RTV-1100cw before bottoming out the frame on the "rubber spring stopper", as Kubota calls it. I had thought that the space between the stopper and frame would make a good reference point. I purchased the RTV used and do not know what the normal stance should be. It seems to me that only an inch of travel at this point would not allow for much travel. I would like to know how much space others have to help determine if this is normal or if I might have weak springs or binding shackles. Thanks!
 

ovrszd

Well-known member
Originally my 900 had the same. RTVs do not have much suspension flexibility. I believe there is some improvement in the newer IRS systems. With the older leaf spring setups there isn't much.
 

cowrider

Member
Thanks for the replies. I would have thought that there would have been more suspension travel on these but it doesn't sound like it. Now I know that it is not to worry about.
 

aurthuritis

Site Supporter
Site Supporter
Thanks for the replies. I would have thought that there would have been more suspension travel on these but it doesn't sound like it. Now I know that it is not to worry about.


that was my thought also. but after owning it for a couple of years it hasn't been a problem at all. the IRS on the X1100c is marvelous though.:thewave:
 

Alaskanassasin

Senior Member
Site Supporter
I checked my x1100c and did not see any type of stopper, it seems like the only thing limiting travel is the length of the shock absorber. Next time I have it in what we call "the overload mode" I will measure the travel in the rear.
 

Groundsmechanic

New member
I checked my x1100c and did not see any type of stopper, it seems like the only thing limiting travel is the length of the shock absorber. Next time I have it in what we call "the overload mode" I will measure the travel in the rear.

Usually on coilover type setups like the IRS units, the bumpstop is located on the shock itself. On these machines it would be under the upper bellows on the shock and cannot be seen. Some other units still have the rubber bumpstop on the frame or control arm but also have it on the shock.

Without the bumpstop on coilovers, the spring would bind at full compression and could possibly cause damage to the spring or shock itself.
 

ovrszd

Well-known member
Usually on coilover type setups like the IRS units, the bumpstop is located on the shock itself. On these machines it would be under the upper bellows on the shock and cannot be seen. Some other units still have the rubber bumpstop on the frame or control arm but also have it on the shock.

Without the bumpstop on coilovers, the spring would bind at full compression and could possibly cause damage to the spring or shock itself.

Yep. Well explained!!!

Welcome to NTT. :)
 
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