Stock wheels to aluminum.

geohorn

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Not certain what you’re requesting...but if you need my shipping address for your steel wheels when you remove them, let me know.
 

Doc

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I think 'homes' is a typeo ....for holes. Tapered holes. So what lug nuts do you need?
My RTV came with the aluminum wheels ...so I can't help.
 
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bordercollie

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When I ordered my shiny rims years ago, they came with new shiny lugs that were made for the rims. I would check to see if new lugs were supposed to be included.
 

Semper-Fi

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What is needed to make the change from steel wheels to aluminum. The new ones have tapered homes. Which bolts?
When i replaced the stock steel wheels on my 2020 X1100C , going to Aluminum wheels, i was provided 8 double ended studs, & 16 deep lug nuts to be used with the new aluminum wheels. None of the old/stock lug nuts would work.
 

Bota Fett

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Kubota catalog lists an alloy hardware kit for their aluminum wheels. Requires Alloy Wheel Hardware Kit (black - K7591-99140) or (silver - K7591-99170)

Last time I was at the dealer, I asked about the shiny wheels. They told me the steel rims are much stronger and better for off road, and heavy work use.

Also curious if you guys carry a spare, a jack, and tire changing tools?
 
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ItBmine

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The aluminums look nice, but I like the steel just for the reasons your dealer said Bota Fett.

And I have been thinking about ordering a spare rim and tire. I go trail riding lots by myself and it would really suck if I got a flat miles from home.
I would pretty much have to sacrifice that rim and tire and keep on driving.
 

Ohio_Pawpaw_Grower

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My RTV came with aluminum rims. I never worried about strength but was concerned about Ohio red clay.mud getting caked on them. As soon as I had the opportunity, I purchased a set of factory steel rims from another member. Then I bought some 10 ply Blackwater Evolutions tires on strong recommendations from other members.

I never worry about a flat stopping me. It would be one long walk to get home however. But if you did somehow get a gash in the sidewall, a spare tire and little bottle jack would be mighty handy. I.am also a fan of the Slime type products.
 

geohorn

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I keep my tires filled with https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NQCCQLP/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
and have absolutely NO fear of flats. This stuff will fix a half-inch hole… and I rarely travel more than a couple miles from home here on the ranch. I can drive on a flat tire that far and buy a new tire on Amazon to replace it just as cheap as I can buy one and watch it dry-rot unused.

I am also a fan of steel wheels…. they are not only stronger but less expensive to replace. Besides, I never liked the look of “Ghetto-Wheels”.
 

Bota Fett

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I keep my tires filled with https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NQCCQLP/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
and have absolutely NO fear of flats. This stuff will fix a half-inch hole… and I rarely travel more than a couple miles from home here on the ranch. I can drive on a flat tire that far and buy a new tire on Amazon to replace it just as cheap as I can buy one and watch it dry-rot unused.

I am also a fan of steel wheels…. they are not only stronger but less expensive to replace. Besides, I never liked the look of “Ghetto-Wheels”.
Are you able to confirm this works as well as they say? Have you had any 1/2 inch punctures? Last thing any of us wants is to have that stuff fail when you need it most. Murphy's law states that I would get a flat in the muddy rain at night furthest away from anything, and freezing my butt off without a coat at the bottom of a ditch, at the bottom of the hill. :mad:

Much easier than carrying a spare, jack and tools for sure. And $54 for ten years comes out to $5.40 a year, if your tires last that long. What a bargain. You make a great point about the spare drying out, not to mention hauling it around every where. I'd rather be hauling a cooler :beer:

It says you can use on travel trailers too, wouldn't that 32 oz's of product unbalance the tire?
 

bordercollie

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Just for everyone to know about, I have had several of the cheap tire repair kits with the T type handles and the sticky black plugs. They did ok on lawnmower tires but were the devil to use on heavy ply tires. So I went out on a limb and bought this one called "Blackjack" . It ran about $45 but man !!!! what a difference in quality !!!!! The T type push/pull handles are substantial on the kit and well, just really impressive. I used one on out 6 ft tall multiply tractor tire and it worked like butter. You would still need a little 12 v compressor for an on the road repair but when I read that 18 wheeler drivers liked it too, I bit the hook and have no regrets. https://smile.amazon.com/Blackjack-...&qid=1625862962&sprefix=tire+,aps,239&sr=8-38
 

Bota Fett

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Hmmmm, plug kit and mini air compressor. Or goopy tires and a prayer. I guess I could do both, and cover most bases.
 

bordercollie

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I really like that the "reamer" is made like an auger. At first, I tried to just push it in like the cheaper file kind I had . Then, I realized the auger profile and just auger 'ed it in. Pulled it out. So easy then to insert the plug.
 

geohorn

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Are you able to confirm this works as well as they say? Have you had any 1/2 inch punctures? Last thing any of us wants is to have that stuff fail when you need it most. Murphy's law states that I would get a flat in the muddy rain at night furthest away from anything, and freezing my butt off without a coat at the bottom of a ditch, at the bottom of the hill. :mad:

Much easier than carrying a spare, jack and tools for sure. And $54 for ten years comes out to $5.40 a year, if your tires last that long. What a bargain. You make a great point about the spare drying out, not to mention hauling it around every where. I'd rather be hauling a cooler :beer:

It says you can use on travel trailers too, wouldn't that 32 oz's of product unbalance the tire?
The product I linked to above is the same product/same people/same mfr’r …only re-named from Multi-seal. Don’t take my word for it…. watch the Project Farm test and decide for yourself. (I’ve tried Slime, Fix-A-Flat and all kinds of other stuff….The Fix A Flat is junk, and I did not have good results with Slime…. also Slime really makes a mess and I’ve tried it on several tractor, wheel-barrows, bikes, carts and dollys …and it just never did work well for me and corroded the wheels. but THIS “Flat-Out” Multi-Seal product stuff really works and does not corrode your wheels, and can even be re-used in the next set of replacement tirres. Here’s the test:
 
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Bota Fett

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According to the video Slime is best for cars and flatout is best for everything else. Fix-a-flat did nothing at all except waste money and make a mess!
 

geohorn

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According to the video Slime is best for cars and flatout is best for everything else. Fix-a-flat did nothing at all except waste money and make a mess!
Yes… on a screw-hole the Slime did well. But notice that the Multi-Seal product even handled the additional damage he did with a big spike. The tester did not subject Slime to that additional persecution. (My own experience with Slime in inner-tube applications was a complete failure on repeated attempts on everything from lawn-tractor-trailer to bicycles and equipment dollies. The “Flat Out” by Multi-Seal is the answer to the mesquite and 1/4”-thorn-bushes we have here in central Texas. I’ve gotten so I don’t even try to steer-around them anymore.

The Slime advertises to be OK for use on-the-highway…. the basic Multi-Seal in that video only specifies off-road vehicles….BUT Multi-Seal does also make a highway-version. Their HD2500 is recommended for over-the-road 18-wheelers and theiir HD3500 product is used by the military. They are a Texas company and know the kinds of hazards we have out here.
 

Ohio_Pawpaw_Grower

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I am fairly certain the lug nuts and studs are different between chrome and steel as well as the center caps. Steel wheels have a rubber pressed in cap where the aluminum rim cap is cap screw attached to the rim.
 

geohorn

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My original steel wheels have no such decorations…. they are attached with ordinary steel studs/nuts.

The industry may or may not have any particular standards either…. my Ram P/U has steel wheels with steel nuts.. my Airstream has aluminum wheels with steel nuts…. my wifes’ Toyota has magnesium wheels with steel nuts….
This makes perfect sense to me since all wheels are attached to all spindles/axles which use steel studs or steel hubs that use steel fasteners.
 
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Ohio_Pawpaw_Grower

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When I took the factory aluminum rims off my 1120D and put on factory steel, I switched lug nuts/studs. The chrome hardware on dark grey looked odd and I wanted to preserve them. RTV spends a lot of time in red clay mud. I don't think you are required to change them out - the tapering is the same. It was just personal preference.
 
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